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Early College at Chelsea High School

Category: Department Overviews, Early College
Credits: 5
Recommended Grades: 11,12
Level: n/a
Length: Full Year
Description:

Background

Chelsea High School provides 11th and 12th graders the opportunity to enroll in Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) Classes during the school day at Chelsea High School. All students are welcome to enroll in Early College Classes no matter what their previous academic performance was or their current GPA. This is an amazing opportunity for students to take college level classes for both high school and college level credit for free! Students can take up to 2 classes per semester for a total of 8 classes in 2 years. Most classes are transferable to State Universities, Community Colleges and many private for year schools.

Ways to Enroll

Students must submit to taking the Accuplacer test (at no cost) to be placed in the appropriate level BHCC classes. Students can meet with their Guidance Counselor or TRIO counselor to set up a time for testing. Following the receipt of their test results, students will meet with their Guidance or TRIO Counselor to select their College classes. Enrollment for Early College classes is on a first come first serve basis, so it's important to test early and register as soon as possible to ensure there is space in your top choices for classes.

Benefits

All classes are free!
  • There are classes for all levels of students
  • Credits are transferrable to most colleges
  • College level academic experience with High School support still available.

See orientation pdf for more details.

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Early College Courses - Fall and Spring

Category: Early College
Recommended Grades: 11,12
Length: Semester
Description:

AHE - 117 - Communications Skills for Health Care Professionals - (Fall and Spring)

This course provides the student with the skills to communicate effectively as an Allied Health Professional. The course includes discussions of verbal and non - verbal communication, professional communication and behavior, interviewing techniques, adapting communication to a patient's ability to understand, patient education, cultural sensitivity, electronic communication, and fundamental writing skills.


ENG - 095 - Writing Skills II - (Fall and Spring)

This course develops language skills needed to communicate effectively in college study, in the professions, and in the business world. The course includes sentence formation, applied grammar, spelling, mechanics, and paragraph development. Note: Students must pass the Basic Writing Competency Exam in order to receive a passing grade for this course. The course does not satisfy the college writing requirement for graduation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Writing Skills I (ENG090) or placement.


ENG - 111 - College Writing I - (Fall and Spring)

This course emphasizes writing as a process, from planning and drafting through revising and editing. Using personal experience, readings, and other sources, students write unified, coherent, well - developed essays and practice paraphrasing, summarizing, and using sources responsibly. To be eligible to take College Writing II (ENG112), students must pass the College Writing Exam and earn a grade of C or better for this course. The course meets General Education "College Writing" Requirement Area 1. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Writing Skills II (ENG095) and Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement.


ENG - 112 - College Writing II - (Fall and Spring)

This course focuses on the research paper, the longer essay, argumentation, critical writing, and reading. The course meets General Education "College Writing" Requirement Area 1. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in College Writing I (ENG111).


ESL - 088 - Academic Reading II - (Fall and Spring)

In this high - intermediate course, students increase their level - appropriate vocabulary and develop their reading skills and strategies as they analyze, discuss, and write about longer readings. Students are also introduced to critical thinking skills such as drawing inferences, understanding idioms and figures of speech, and recognizing purpose and perspective. Students learn grammar in the context of the reading materials and in student generated writing. Students must earn a C or better in order to pass the course. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ESL074, ESL075, ESL078, and ESL079, or placement.


ESL - 089 - Academic Writing II - (Fall and Spring)

In this high intermediate course, students develop their writing skills with a focus on the process of college writing from planning and drafting to revising and editing. Students demonstrate their critical thinking skills by writing paragraphs and essays from their personal experience and from readings of moderate complexity. Students practice correct grammar and mechanics in the context of the readings and their own writing. Students must pass the ESL089 Writing Competency Exam and earn a grade of C or better in order to pass the course. Students must earn a C or better in order to pass the course. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ESL074, ESL075, ESL078, and ESL079, or placement.


ESL - 099 - Academic Writing III - (Fall and Spring)

This advanced course focuses on the academic writing skills necessary for success in college content courses. Students develop their abilities with sentence structure, paragraph writing, and essay writing through extensive practice with multiple drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. Students write from personal experience, answer essay questions from readings of substantial complexity, and write essays using research sources. Students learn grammar in the context of the readings and student generated writing. Students must pass the ESL099 Writing Competency Exam and earn a C or better in order to pass the course. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ESL086, ESL087, ESL088, and ESL089 or placement.


NHP - 180 - Medical Terminology - (Fall and Spring)

This course provides instruction in the development of basic medical terminology. Competency in medical terminology promotes effective communication among members of the healthcare team.


PSY - 101 - Principles of Psychology - (Fall and Spring)

This introductory psychology course covers a survey of information and theory. Topics include the brain and behavior, research methods, learning, consciousness, motivation, emotion, human growth and development, personality, abnormal behavior, and psychotherapy, social cognition and understanding. The course meets General Education "Individual and Society" Requirement Area 2. Prerequisite: Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or co - enrollment in integrated courses, or exemption by placement testing.


SOC - 101 - Principles of Sociology - (Fall and Spring)

This course covers an introduction to the concepts and theories of society and social institutions. The course meets General Education Individual and Society Requirement Area 2. Prerequisite: Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or co - enrollment in integrated courses or exemption from reading requirement by placement testing.

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Early College Courses - Fall Only

Category: Early College
Recommended Grades: 11,12
Length: Semester
Description:

CRJ - 117 - Street Law - (Fall Only)

This course examines the origins of the American Legal System through an analysis of its function, sources and its varied aspects. This course introduces students to fundamental criminal law and constitutional law principles, and provides a platform for guided discussions of important public policy issues concerning, crime, discrimination, healthcare, and immigration. The course uses the latest instructional technology including e - portfolios, case studies, simulated legal exercises, small group exercises and analytical thought problems to develop higher - level thinking skills that prepare students for other course work in criminal justice, law, sociology, history, and government.


EDU ? 102 - Becoming a Teacher - (Fall Only)

This learning community seminar is designed for education majors who are interested in making a difference in today's public schools. The seminar will focus on the pressing issues in today's public schools: overcrowding, lack of funding, outdated curriculum, classroom chaos, and shortage of good teachers, and many others. The Learning Community Seminars enable first - year students to make successful transitions to college while developing their abilities to reflect and assess; discover their strengths; explore career interests; set goals and problem solve with critical thinking, information literacy and communication skills; and connect with peers, faculty and staff in a diverse learning environment. This seminar will focus on education as students grow in their understanding of themselves and the world of education. While recommended for Education majors, those in Early Childhood Development, and Human Services will find the material useful. Students from other majors are welcome to enroll if interested in pursuing teaching as a career in the future. Prerequisite: Student must be in first two semesters of study at BHCC with 16 college credits or less completed.


GOV?101 - Gov/Politics in US - (Fall Only)

The course explores some questions and theories that interest political scientists and historians, and methods they use to explain governmental operations. Insight into the nature of political ideals, as embodied in the Constitution, is developed. Topics include federalism, organization and functions of the three branches of the national government, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion and voting behavior, the media, bureaucracies, and public policy. This course meets General Education "Individual and Society" Requirement Area 2. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095); and Writing Skills II (ENG095); or exemption by placement testing.

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Early College Courses - Spring Only

Category: Early College
Recommended Grades: 11,12
Length: Semester
Description:

HIS102 - Western Civilization from Renaissance - (Spring Only)

This course covers a survey of the major intellectual, social, economic, and political developments in Western civilization since the 17th century. It emphasizes the roots of contemporary institutional and ideological problems. The course meets General Education "World View" Requirement Area 3. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Academic Reading III (ESL098) and Academic Writing III (ESL099) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) and Writing Skills II (ENG095); or exemption by placement testing.


SOC - 227 - Sociology of Race & Ethnicity - (Spring Only)

This course explores issues of race and ethnicity as they exist in contemporary American society. W will look at the definition of race and ethnicity, how these definitions have evolved over time, and what they mean today. The impact of hate groups on American life and culture will be explored through the concept of difference and the ideas of superiority and inferiority. Core topics to be discussed include radical prejudice and racism, ethnic identity and multiculturalism, and Eurocentrism. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC101), Principles of Psychology (PSY101), or Cultural Anthropology (SOC109).

CIT - 110 - Applications/Concepts - (Spring only)

This survey course covers the use and application of modern computer systems. This course includes detailed coverage of fundamental computer concepts, terminology, applications, and theory. Students will get extensive 'hands - on' personal computer experience and gain a good working knowledge of MS WINDOWS and MS OFFICE. Upon completion of this course, students will have a grasp of important computer concepts and terminology, an understanding of INTERNET use and applications, a high degree of competence with personal computer hardware and software, as well as an understanding of the effects of information technology on the individual, organizations, and society. All Learner Outcomes and Competencies in this course are based on accepted, published ICT Industry Standards. Students with prior learning experience may test out of this course by contacting pla@bhcc.mass.edu. Prerequisite: Reading Skills II (RDG095) or Academic Reading III (ESL098) or exemption from reading requirement by placement testing or enrollment in an integrated course.


CRJ - 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice - (Spring only)

This course is an introduction to the purpose and functions of the criminal justice system. This course will provide students with the history and role of the American Criminal Justice System, and a description of the police, courts, and corrections at the local, state, and federal levels. The course will emphasize the current growing problems of the criminal justice system, ethical issues and professionalism, as well as the future trends of the system. Introduction to criminal justice is of practical concern to professional personnel involved in the system, and also to anyone who wants to understand better the aim of criminal law and how the criminal justice system operates. The course fulfills the Learning Community Seminar requirement for students in AS Criminal Justice. Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095), and Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement.

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Academic Departments and Course Search


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